Frequent question: What is the legal name for a green card?

What is a legal immigrant called?

Any person not a citizen of the United States who is residing the in the U.S. under legally recognized and lawfully recorded permanent residence as an immigrant. … Also known as “Permanent Resident Alien,” “Resident Alien Permit Holder,” and “Green Card Holder.”

Is green card same as legal permanent resident?

Lawful permanent residents (LPRs), also known as “green card” holders, are non-citizens who are lawfully authorized to live permanently within the United States. … They also may apply to become U.S. citizens if they meet certain eligibility requirements.

What are the 4 types of immigrants?

To begin with, let’s look at the four types of immigration status that exist: citizens, residents, non-immigrants and undocumented. The characteristics of each status are explained below.

Can you stay on green card forever?

Once you become a lawful permanent resident (Green Card holder), you maintain permanent resident status until you: Apply for and complete the naturalization process; or. Lose or abandon your status.

How do you get a green card if you are illegal?

Undocumented Immigrants Might Qualify for Green Card by Marrying U.S. Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident. Entering into a valid, bona fide (real, not sham) marriage with a U.S. citizen (of the same or opposite sex) makes you an “immediate relative” under the U.S. immigration laws.

IT IS INTERESTING:  How do I extend my Mexican tourist visa?

How many types of green cards are there?

There are basically four categories of Green Cards, each one with their separate visas and requirements: Family sponsored Green Cards – this Green Card is given to you if you have close family in the US and you want to reunite with them.

What is the difference between lawful permanent resident and permanent resident?

What is a lawful permanent resident? A lawful permanent resident is someone who has been granted the right to live in the United States indefinitely. Permanent residence includes the right to work in the U.S. for most employers or for yourself. Permanent residents continue to hold citizenship of another country.